Prominent Counter-Terrorism Analyst: Star Journalist’s Crash "Consistent With a Car Cyber Attack"

Michael Hastings

Rolling Stone Journalist Michael Hastings


Former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism Richard Clarke has said that there is reason to believe that intelligence agencies for major world powers including the United States have the capability to remotely seize control of a car. The facts surrounding the fatal car crash of journalist Michael Hastings, Clarke indicated, would be “consistent with a car cyber attack.” The Young Turks Cenk Uygur tells the story.

Security Analyst Reveals Remote Killer Capability

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“The US Government Has Betrayed the Internet,” Bruce Schneier

SchneierOnNSAandInternet

By Bruce Schneier

theguardian.com

Sep 5, 2013

 

I don’t know whether Bruce Schneier still believes that all the  Parkland Memorial Hospital doctors who examined JFK’s exploded skull in 1963 could not tell an exit wound from an entry wound or whether he still believes that a bunch of nuts hiding in some cave somewhere outwitted the entire United States air defense system in 2001, but when it comes to Internet security this man knows his stuff.  Check out his recent article in The Guardian.


By subverting the internet at every level to make it a vast, multi-layered and robust surveillance platform, the NSA has undermined a fundamental social contract. The companies that build and manage our internet infrastructure, the companies that create and sell us our hardware and software, or the companies that host our data: we can no longer trust them to be ethical internet stewards.read entire article


What a 19th Century ‘Googler’ Can Tell Us About Today’s Obsessive CEOs

elon_musk

By Joshua Kendall

wired.com

Sep 2, 2013


We frequently glorify our obsessive innovators, but they clearly have both strengths and weaknesses. The same intensity that can produce stratospheric success also has the potential to destroy them and those around them. As long as these obsessive innovators can find an outlet for their obsessiveness — say, a thriving company where they are given a loose leash by the board — they tend to do well, though underlings may suffer on account of their bluntness.
read entire article